• Keef Hellinger

Blog 164 Part 2 Holiday 2010 Diary plus 1999 & 1997 created 22 retrospective ❤

Updated: Mar 11

By keef and annie hellinger, Feb 20 2022 15.41 pm

This diary accompanied the BLOG 164 and audiobook versions of it are available on the BIG TRIPS page on this website. We are now on Soundcloud for all our audiobooks but if you wish to listen to the Diary rather than read it please click HERE



holiday 2010 trip diary and audiobook info image
holiday 2010 trip diary and audiobook info image

ACROSS CANADA IN A MOTORHOME DAIRIES MENU


  1. Full Diary

  2. Alberta 2010

  3. Saskatchewan 2010

  4. Manitoba 2010

  5. Ontario 2010

  6. Quebec 2010

  7. New Brunswick 2010

  8. Prince Edward Island 2010

  9. Nova Scotia 2010

  10. Newfoundland 2010

  11. Labrador 2010

  12. Upstate New York 2010

  13. Maine 2010

  14. Audiobook


FULL DIARY


ACROSS CANADA IN A MOTORHOME in the years 1999 & 2010 Plus the USA: Florida,Upstate New York,Maine (2010) and Florida (1997)

In 2010 We were in Canada between 18th May and 25th July 2010. Stayed with our friends David & Cathy in Edmonton for 5 days but visited Lesser Slave Lakes, then picked up our campervan / motorhome (Canadreams) in Calgary and travelled for roughly 9 weeks across to the east seeing all provinces (apart from Yukon, North West Territories & Nunavut) plus dropped across the US border into upstate New York & Maine including the wonderful Bar Harbor, so combined with our 1999 trip when we were essentially in British Columbia and the Rockies region as well as Vancouver Island and a brief sojourn to visit our pals in Edmonton, Alberta we have now crossed from one side of Canada to the other (it is the 2nd largest country on earth) At the end of our 2010 trip we flew back from Halifax Nova Scotia

One of the comments from David in 1999 when we camped about 300 miles away from his home was "you were just down the road, you should have come here instead of camping there"... just gives you an illustration of how vast the wonderful Canada is when Canadians mentality suggests 300 miles is a hop, step and a jump away, for us Brits thats almost a 1/3 rd of the country. 😉


However, Doug did love fishing and making real campfires. So now been across whole of that part of North America if one includes our 1999 trip (also covered by blog 166 as well as here) covering Vancouver Island, British Columbia and into Edmonton, Alberta.


This was all designed by KeefH Web Designs of Sandiacre, Derbyshire, the United Kingdom. Maybe CONTACT KeefH Web Designs, Sandiacre, Derbyshire, UK on +44 (0)7843962729 Please help by taking our KHWD Survey (less than 1 minute of your time, honest), thanks email keef.hellinger@ntlworld.com if you are interested in help


CANADA 2010 we went ACROSS CANADA IN A MOTORHOME 2010, Alberta to Labrador (we did British Columbia in 1999) plus States New York & Maine in the USA in 2010, it was such fun and quite an achievement.


In summary it consisted of 87 Days travel Canada - 18th May - 24th July 2010, 1769 Photos, Approximately 4200 miles, the Highlights were Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump, Seeing the Harveys (dear friends), Dauphin, Wrestling with the badly sorted Steering wheel on the very windy Prairies, Maid of the Mist on Niagara Falls, Red Bay Labrador, Canada day in Fredericton, Gaspe peninsular, Mounties museum in Regina, Riding Mountain National Park in Manitoba, seeing Moose plus potentially more importantly achieving travelling from one side of Canada to the other - all provinces (Canada does provinces, America does states-BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland (Newfie heaven) & Labrador.


In sequence we visited Alberta is one of the 3 Prairie Provinces. We spent 11 Days in Alberta, Canada - 18th - 29th May 2010, 219 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, we have now been from one side of canada to the other in a motorhome, BC to Labrador, loved it, fabulous countryine hat, head smashed in buffalo jump world heritage site, snow at high river end of may, the campsite said happy christmas (smile) when we arrived, 2 caravans were ruined by falling branches weighed down by weight of the snow, plus cardston, high prairie, staying with dear friends david & cathy and family, west ed mall, dawson bridge, perogies, tyrrell heritage centre, fort ed, winterton lakes np, bow river, border with montana glacial park, red deer, calgary, brand new motorhome, hoo doos at willow creek, blackfoot tribe and many more gems, we have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, BC to Labrador, loved it, fabulous country. Why not have a look at the Prairies Provinces talkies video whilst you are about it, it shows all our spoken word highlights in those 3 provinces. Worth a listen I promise you.


Now to the second prairie province, Saskatchewan. We spent 5 Days in Saskatchewan, Canada - 29th May-2nd June 2010, 79 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, amongst others we covered saskatchewan landing, saskatoon, regina, visiting the RCMP "mounties" academy, chapel and museum in regina , goodwin house, red river cart, wanuskewin heritage centre, heritage, prairies, railways, swift current, elbow, davidson, we learnt about the cree, matis and lakota tribes, hudson bay company, meewasin park plus we saw bears and we have now been right across canada in a motorhome and we loved it #FACT


Then we visited the last of the Prairie provinces, Manitoba, we spent 3 Days in Manitoba, Canada - 2nd-4th June 2010, 67 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective covering macgregor, duaphin, dryden, winnipeg , winnipeg beach, riding mountain national park, clear water (lac) lake, assiniboine river, shellmouth reservoir, steinbach, bears, moose , Mennonite heritage village @ steinbach and all ports in between. In case you missed it haha we have been from one side of canada to the other #fact


We then moved onto the central provinces, firstly Ontario, including Canada’s capital Ottawa. We spent 15 Days in Ontario, Canada between 4th-20th June 2010, we took 372 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others nipigon, wawa, elliot lake, new liskeard, musselmans lake, toronto, niagara falls – just fab, 1000 islands boat trip from Gananoque and we did learn how to make that famous dressing on board, percy lake, ignace, sault ste marie, wabigoon lakes, agimak lake& beach, rossport, terrace bay, pays plat, thunder bay, the great lakes-superior, huron, ontario & dipping my toe in them, niagara on the lake, Sinclair cove, mounties on horses and foot, ottawa, aguasarbon falls, lake superior national park, Latchford where annie’s uncle and family once travelled as nearby and indeed their street was named such, spanish, temigami, temiskaming shores, bobbie rosenfeld olympian & park, stouffville, niagara botanical gardens, floral clock, devils hole whirlpool, st Lawrence river, gananoque town and harbor, rideau falls, river and canal, byward market and saw some fascinating street food, haileybury the home of Annie's rellies and found some nice folk who had indeed been taught by him at the Hailbury museum (we joined their mailing list for a bit with respect to genealogy) and all ports in between.


It may be worth having a look at the Central Provinces spoken word videos at this point which act as a type of audiobook.


It was then on to that most 17th French speaking province and the final one in the central region Quebec. This is most distinctively THE French Province, the McGarrigle sister are a huge plus as is Celine Dion but they are in our humble opinion somewhat just too parochial, we noted as we crossed the border how it instantly felt like English was verboten. Our pals find it odd as well since it was the Quebecoise who insisted that all road signs are written in dual language yet Quebec is the only province that doesn’t do that tee hee, David said if geographically they were on either edge of Canada they could easily be awarded independence, still that won’t happen.

We spent 11 Days in Quebec, Canada - between 10th June & 13th July 2010, taking 178 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others montreal, quebec city, fort quebec, the queen’s governor’s residence, chateau Frontenac, wow what a grand hotel almost a French chateau , saguenay fjord, tadoussac, trois pistoles, gaspe,saw the city bike race, the citadel,the fab st lawrence river, lac timiscaming, les escoumins, bardville, ferry, grande grave, campsite juneau, cap de rosier, forillon national park, camping baie de gaspe where sadly as I dished out our cooked brekkie on the outside wooden table it collapsed and spread hot food over both of us – not good but on reflection funny, it was caused by me sitting on the same side of the wooden bench as Annie and sad to say it couldn’t cope with my extra weight tee hee, riviere au renard, basilica notre dame du quebec, rocking chairs, kayaks, l’heritage 1, light houses, boardwalks, musicians, rooftops, skyscrapers, robbie burns in montreal, maison maillou, point a la recommee, dolphins, possibly whales, sunsets, provisional and national parcs & all ports in between. All very french "trois service sil vous plais"


It was then onto the first of our Maritime Provinces, namely New Brunswick which still had in most parts a French feel. We spent 14 Days in New Brunswick, Canada - between 24th June & 25th July 2010, 78 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others alma, campbellton, lighthouses, miscou island, lamere island, kouchibouguac np, bay of fundy np which is world famous for the tidal change in height, fantastic to see, provincial parcs, butland’s lobster (yummy), beaver tails which was a distinctive fast food chain across Canada as indeed is that dead ice hockey player Tim Hortons which is now in the UK along with that other North American stalwart Taco Bells (we always assumed it wouldn’t be long before each invaded our shores haha), art and art galleries, music, arcadians, micmacs, mcadam station, cape jourmain, confederation bridge, sea dogs ice hockey, covered cedar bridge tunnels, hopewell rocks, grand anse, baseball, bog walks, plant life, harbors, sun and rain in equal measures, magnetic hill, magic village, bathurst, val-comeau, cap egmont, moncton, saint john (as opposed to st johns in newfie) looking for Annie’s rellies, petit codiac river, possum in the road kill cafe, fredericton for canada day 1 July, Japanese tourists asking to see inside our van (they were fascinated bizarrely… I guess like China which we do know about from Phoenix’s parents camping is just not a common occurrence) , and lots of places in between.


It may be worth looking at the Maritime provinces talkies video which acts as a spoken word audiobook of our time in the Maritimes, such lovely provinces, indeed there isn’t a bad one from one side of Canada to the other.


Then it was Prince Edward Island (PEI) the 2nd of the Maritimes, a holiday island, we went twice, Charlotte town is just lovely, it’s the capital. We went once on our touring journet and then returned when David & Cathy were on holiday there, they flew from Edmonton Alberta across. We spent 7 Days on Prince Edward Island, Canada, between 27th June & 25th July 2010, we took 90 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others PEI a holiday resort or as some people unkindly refer to it "spud" island, summerside, anne of green gables house @ cavendish, charlottetown, many heritage buildings, crossing the fab confederation bridge arriving at borden-carleton, meeting up with friends - the lovely Harveys,we made 2 visits here ,saw live music, the bottle house, tigish, cape egmont and lighthouse, north cape, north point lighthouse, victoria, georgetown, spud radio, lobsters, energy institute, queens wharf, lucy maud Montgomery (yes here of anne of green gables fame , huge with Japanese school kids it seems) , sand sculptures and cedar cladding plus saw a lot of other places on the island.


Then it was onto the third of the Maritime provinces, Nova Scotia, yes it does sound Scottish, and it definitely has a lot of that character, whiskey and highland games being 2 of the times to that ancient mainland origins . Remember many Scots migrated to Canada to avoid crofting law changes and indeed starvation, through out history folks have moved continents for a chance of a better life, including my rellies who escaped from “beyond the pale” or in escaping greater Germany / Russia from Latvia “pale of Settlement” … a quick definition is “From pale (“jurisdiction of an authority, territory under an authority's jurisdiction”), suggesting that anything outside the authority's jurisdiction was uncivilized. The phrase was in use by the mid-17th century, and is a reference to the general sense of boundary (outside of the palisades), but is sometimes understood to refer specifically to the English Pale in Ireland, as well as the Pale of Settlement in Imperial Russia. In the nominally English territory of Ireland, only the Pale fell genuinely under the authority of English law, hence the terms within the pale and beyond the pale. In Russia, Jews were relegated to living in the Pale, and mostly forbidden to live or work “beyond the pale.

We spent 11 Days in Nova Scotia, Canada, between 8th & 25th July 2010, we took 294 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective visiting amongst others the wonderful bay of fundy, many heritage buildings especially at annapolis royal & lunneburg, highland games at antigonish, watching someones awning bend in high winds at the campsite, wolfville, crossing the fab confederation bridge near mayfield (NB) ,cape breton National Park, the truly magnificent peggys cove at st margarets bay inmour humble opinion a place that could join the elite wonders of the world indeed definitely in our book the 1001 places to see before you die, they are listed on the site with all the ones we have been to and the ones we are yet to visit… note to self-please! , halifax and KEITH’s beer (got the t-shirt) ferry from sydney to newfoundland, far too much fizzy pop in fast food joint (free refill - never again!), cap le moine, cheticamp, cape breton, cabot trail with views to die for, pugwash, bog walk, pictou, glenora distillery the only single malt in canada, ingonish, broad cove campground, joe’s scarecrow visited by billy connolly and us (sadly closed in 2011), the highlands national park, louisbourg and the fortress, wolfe and the french, halifax, murray-mackay bridge, pier 21 a very interesting museum which so much about migration to these new lands, prospect, shelburne, port maitland beach, cresent beach, yarmouth, digby, lockeport and more


Now onto our 4th Maritme province and maybe one of the oldest with the weirdest accent derived from the fisher folk who came over from the oh-ah counties of England, i.e. Dorset, Devon and Cornwall, after all Newfoundland is “just across the water” maybe haha. We love the Newfies and their scenery and moose. We spent 6 Days in Newfoundland, Canada, between 11th & 16th July 2010, took 158 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others l'anse au claire, st johns (as opposed to st john in NB) fab harbour views here, moose by the roadside,the wonderful gros morne national park, gander, bonavista, conception bay, st mary’s, icebergs floating past, st anthony museum and the size of a polar bear, just see that picture of annie standing next to one standing on its hind legs and you will see how dwarfed she was, , ferry at st barbe to labrador and a very early morning sailing in rain and mist, we parked in the ferry carpark overnight so as not to miss it, port aux basque,deer lake, grand falls windsor, corner brook, fab whale museum and houses at scilly cove (now winterton) home of annie’s rellie john masters, indian harbour, steady brook,3 mile rock, long beach, pynns brook, springdale, grate cove, gambo, the perlican,nymph island, portland creek,little hearts ease (such a lovely name),red rocks, noddy bay, st lunaire-griquet, the arches National Park ,the ship the SS ethie, bonne & shallow bays, gunners cove, cape ray and wreck house brook.


Then onto our final Province, Labrador which sadly is mostly impassable except in the height of winter when the perma frost TLH or Trans Labrador Highway allows passage between the many remote and sparse towns and settlements. The capital of Labrador is Labrador City which in fairness is not really a city nor a capital. Labrador and Newfoundland often act as one due to the very low population numbers. We were really only able to go along the coast road as far as Red Bay and the start of the TLH. We spent 2 Days in Labrador, Canada - between 12th & 13th July 2010, 51 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others the ferry apollo departing st barbe newfoundland at an ungodly hour and arriving at blanc sablon, l'anse au clair (where we camped overnight), forteau, travelling the jersey trail, l'anse au covert, l'anse amour, red bay including the museum and look out at old whaling station, saddle & capstan islands, start of the trans labrador highway (gravel and permafrost) oh and black fly galore on the pinware river bridge.


That’s all folks for Canada 2010 at least but now onto the 2 American states we popped over into in 2010 and our earlier visit to British Columbia in 1999 with Doug in a hired motorhome, he was 15, and then our family visit to Florida back in 1997, this was car and motel, no motorhome involved.


So to Upstate New York , the bit basically around the River Niagara but so glad we did it, crossing Lewiston-Wellesley, we spent 2 Days in Upstate New York (NY), USA - between 14th & 15th June 2010, 28 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others a fraught crossing at lewiston into the states because of the hired motorhome, and on return "mam I've told you to remove those sun glasses, I want to see the whites of your eyes" (smile), niagara falls (both canadian and us sides), rochester, banal local tv about geese "sh***ting on boardwalk", oh and trash can episode at the very nice campsite on the lake edge, watertown, apples & cherries,country stores, hummers plus crossing back to canada near wellesley island, youngstown & the boss i.e. mr springsteen, one of my fave he and the east street band tracks, oneida lake.


Maybe have a listen to the American state talkies videos 2010 which act as a sort of audiobook of our time there.


Then when in New Brunswick we crossed over into the US state of Maine, we were naughty and tried to find a completely out of the way border crossing as after the fiasco and hassle at the Lewiston border control, officialdom gone nuts, we wanted an easy crossing, sadly even though we were in the middle of the woods which seemed to be nowhere we were heavily checked again, maybe sensible I suppose with some of the border issues the States faces.


We spent 3 Days in Maine (ME), USA - between 4th (Independance day) & 5th July 2010, 69 Photos, the summary slideshow is selective, visiting amongst others bar harbor, lincoln, bangor, crossing the border at a small centre near mcadams, lubec, west quoddy lighthouse, shopping for milk "near the guns, rifles and bullets, sir!", that was a walmart in Lincoln where we also bought some warmer clothing now sadly all gone (2022), the staff were amazingly polite, 4th july at campsite near bar harbor, flags, burgers and beers, plus crossing back to canada , lobster rolls (yummy) from gas stations, miles not kilometres and cheap gas. We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in case you didn’t guess haha and visited quite a few states in America. #tick


So now back to British Columbia, Vancouver Island and Edmonton, Alberta and visiting friends. In summary our trip to Canada in 1999 was between 11 August to 4th September, 25 days in our hired All Drive Classic 3000 3 berth motorhome, we started in Vancouver, went to see the Rockies, then across on the ferry to Vancouver island where we went to Tofino to do some whale watching, actually saw a pod of Killer Whales better known as Orca's, it was just magical, then back to see more of British Columbia eventually travelling up to Edmonton in Alberta to visit our pals David & Cathy & family, magical times with Doug who was 15 at that stage, fishing and chopping logs for our wild camp fire cooking was a true highlight. We stayed in some very remote campsites and managed to avoid the bears! 😉but not the long drop loos.


Then it was Florida (FL) USA with the boys, including Kissimee, Tampa, the Keys, Everglades, Cape Kennedy Space Station, we returned again in 2018 on our 40th Wedding Anniversary cruise, you can read our motorhome-travels blog number 125 for further details if you are interested. We spent 15 days holiday between 26 July and 9 August 1997, highlights were Family Time at all these, Clearwater Beach, Tampa and West Palm Beach plus of course Disney & Miss Piggy #sigh, we stayed at apartment 126, The Villas of Somerset, Kissimmee, Florida, USA, 34746, and here's a summary Initially stayed in Kissimmee for 2 weeks and visited ALL the theme parks & water parks. Going back into Universal after 7pm is a good call as it saved the queues. Saw central Orlando. We then travelled across to the west, Tampa, Busch Gardens park, clearwater, sanibel, sarasota, venice , naples, then back to the east via the Everglades and down the Keys: Largo, Marathon, Bahia Honda National Park (NP), Key West then back up via Fort Lauderdale, Miami (although didn't go in here in 97 but did in 2018) to Orlando plus Kennedy Space Station , Cocoa beach, River Country, Cracker Barrel, 25 Disney Anniversary, Typhoon Lagoon, Sports World, River Country, Universal, Water World, MGM Studios, Pleasure Island, Blizzard Beach, Tower of Terror, Backlot , giant heavy video cameras & animation tours.


So that really is all folks. Suggest you explore the website HOLIDAY2010 https://www.holiday2010.co.uk and feast your eyes on all the wonderful You Tube videos and image slideshows that accompanied that wonderful experience we now call a holiday.


Best wishes KeefH Web Designs. Big love, hugs and best wishes to you all


Alberta 18-29 May 2010

Summary: We spent 11 Days in Alberta, Canada - 18th - 29th May 2010


We took 219 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Alberta the following were some of the highlights, Medicine hat, head smashed in buffalo jump world heritage site, snow at high river end of May, the campsite said happy Christmas (smile) when we arrived, 2 caravans were ruined by falling branches weighed down by weight of the snow, plus we also enjoyed visiting Carston, high prairie, staying with dear friends David & Cathy and family in Edmonton, west ed mall, Dawson bridge, perogies, royal Tyrrell heritage centre, dinosaur museum although when we got there it was closed but the surrounding Drumheller area including the Hoodoos was amazingly interesting, fort Edmonton park with David, it was a little contrived but interesting none the less, its where keef learned to his cost that if you ask for Burger & Chips what you get is a burger and a bag of crisps, ha-ha, Winterton lakes national park on the border with Montana in the States where we saw the wild buffalo roam, bow river, border with montana glacial park, red deer, Calgary, picking up our brand new hire motorhome from CanaDreams in Calgary with posh new carpets and then having to pull out onto the Trans-Canada Highway almost straight away was scary, plus we bought towels to put down over the carpets to protect them, Canadreams more that happy as we paid to the petrol to reposition their van on the other side of Canada at the end of our trip, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, loved the hoo doos at willow creek, Blackfoot tribe and many more gems.


We remember also and in no particular order, many railway lines but very few trains, its all cars in Canada apart from the odd cargo train, the problem bear in an out of the way township, chopping logs for our own campfire pits, long drop loos, national and provincial parks to camp in at reasonable cost, grouard, it was the wild rose province, world heritage site at fort McLeod, ice rinks and ice hockey, Tim Horton’s, downtown Edmonton, the Strathcona street car, various interpretive centres full of info, the town of high prairie, UNESCO sites, mega trucks, Mennonite sects, Bow River, Fescue prairies, the centre of Alberta at Swan Hills, Tee Pees and 1st Nation education for us, just so interesting cultures, spray valley park, the fantastic slave lakes , prince of Wales hotel, rocky mountain high, buffalo, sheep, deer, goats and endless wild life, fort MacMurray, peanut and jelly bagels, Scottish bag pipers, mountains and snow, that’s all folks, we loved Alberta a big tick from us.


Saskatchewan, 29th May to 2nd June 2010

Summary: We spent 5 Days in Saskatchewan, Canada from 20th May to the 2Nd of June 2010


We took 79 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Saskatchewan the following were some of the highlights, Saskatchewan landing provincial park and camping there, a bit of a write up on this campsite we stayed at is, Straddling the South Saskatchewan River Valley at the west end of Lake Diefenbaker, the Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park celebrates the site of the first historic crossing on the South Saskatchewan River. A great area to be enjoyed by all ages, the park is popular for its fishing, sun-bathing, and hiking opportunities. This park features several interpretive trails and historic sites including the handsome Goodwin House, now home to the park’s visitor centre, main office and interpretive centre. The boat launch is located on the north side of the lake while the main beach area, located on the west side of the park, is a perfect place to enjoy a warm summer’s day.


We remember with some fondness saskatoon, Regina, visiting the Royal Canadian Mounted Police - RCMP "Mounties" academy, see the link in the overview on the HOLIDAY 2010 site for more details, chapel and museum in Regina (capital of Saskatchewan), Goodwin house, red river cart, the fantastically interesting wanuskewin heritage centre, and here are a few words about its heritage, and what it hopes to show,


Wanuskewin Heritage Park sits above the Opimihaw Creek and the South Saskatchewan River near Saskatoon – a window into a part of Canada’s history that remains largely undiscovered, and a link to our past unlike any other National Historic Site in Canada. Wanuskewin’ s uniqueness is not just the fact that there exists evidence of ancient peoples, but rather the composition of many different aspects of habitation, hunting and gathering, and spirituality – all in one place.

The Wanuskewin area contains some of the most exciting archaeological finds in North America, many of which pre-date the pyramids of Egypt. To date, 19 Pre-Contact archaeological dig sites have been identified on the terraces and point bars in the Opimihaw Creek valley bottom or coulee depressions along the valley wall of the South Saskatchewan River. As soon as the Opimihaw Creek valley became available for human occupation 6,000 years ago, virtually every Pre-Contact cultural group recognized across the Great Plains visited this location. The result is a remarkably complete and intact record of cultural development in the region over that time span. The archaeological resources of Wanuskewin are exceptional and among the finest examples of Pre-Contact occupation of the Great Plains of North America.

Indigenous peoples of the Northern Plains came to the Opimihaw Creek area year-after-year, following the bison and range animals who provided sustenance, and gathering plants of the prairies. Their way of life evolved to suit their unique environment. Wanuskewin today gives us the opportunity to delve into the past and discover what life was like for these nomadic hunter-gatherer peoples. The theme of Wanuskewin Heritage Park is one of interpretation – exploring and explaining the meaning of Plains cultures to gain a better understanding of ourselves, Saskatchewan’s Indigenous peoples, and our common heritage.



The wind on the Prairies and having to take the van back into the Canadreams depot in Regina to get the steering sorted, as a new van it was incredibly dangerous to drive in high winds with it badly attuned, they agreed and fixed it thank god, then we had no further problems, rf prairies, railways, swift current, elbow, davidson, First nations including cree, matis, lakota tribes, hudson bay company, meewasin park plus we saw bears and moose.


Other things we remember in no order are, it is called the land of living skies and we can see why, the old colonial government house in Regina, swift current battle field, wheat and barley fields and grain stores everywhere, Lake Diefenbaker and memories of that TV show from our childhood, cranberries growing in fields, shaw street marching, bison heads, railways and cedar clad out buildings, there is just so much local wood in Canada via its massive forests that you would expect houses, apart from the risk of fire, to be built with wood, they often are, north exhibition artwork, which was just so brilliant, chief sitting bull, the wheat belt town of Kyle across the windy plains, the Hudson bay company heritage in Regina, fort ellice on the elbow trail, and a whole lot more, maybe have a look at the slideshows and images on the website to accompany these fine words, thanks

Manitoba, 2-4 June 2010

Summary: We spent 3 Days in Manitoba Province, Canada from 2nd to the 4th of June 2010


We took 67 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Manitoba the following were some of the highlights,macgregor, duaphin, dryden, winnipeg , winnipeg beach, lake Winnipeg, here are some extra words about Winnipeg which we drove thru, it was hard to stop as a big city but we did see a bit and especially remember the golden boy on top of the central building, quite an icon, it is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba in Canada. It is centred on the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, near the longitudinal centre of North America. As of 2021, Winnipeg had a city population of 749,607 and a metropolitan population of 834,678, making it the sixth-largest city, and eighth-largest metropolitan area in Canada.

The city is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg; the name comes from the Western Cree words for muddy water. The region was a trading centre for Indigenous peoples long before the arrival of Europeans; it is the traditional territory of the Anishinabe (Ojibway), Ininew (Cree), Oji-Cree, Dene, and Dakota, and is the birthplace of the Métis Nation. French traders built the first fort on the site in 1738. A settlement was later founded by the Selkirk settlers of the Red River Colony in 1812, the nucleus of which was incorporated as the City of Winnipeg in 1873. Being far inland, the local climate is extremely seasonal even by Canadian standards with average January highs of around −11 °C (12 °F) and average July highs of 26 °C (79 °F).


Other things we remember well are riding mountain national park, clear water (lac) lake, assiniboine river, shell mouth reservoir, Steinbach, bears, moose , the Mennonite heritage village @ Steinbach, Winnipeg town hall, past roller coasters at Winnipeg beach town, welcome to Manitoba sign proudly saying spirited and vibrant energy, boardwalks, train stations not much used, dry corn fields on the plains, tractors, school buses and how one had to ensure you didn’t overtake them when they stopped, fabulous old tills, crafts and art work, learning about other cultures and civilisations, lac clear lake, wild flowers, picnics, the golden boy on the Manitoba legislative building plus many others. In case you missed it ha-ha we have been from one side of Canada to the other.


Some additional words on the Steinbach Mennonite village which was truly interesting are, that it tells the story of the Russian Mennonites in Canada. The museum contains both an open-air museum open seasonally, and an indoor building open year-round. Opened in 1967 and expanded significantly since then, it is a major tourist attraction in the area. Approximately 47,000 visitors visit the museum each year. The village features original Mennonite housebarns, churches, and other buildings, some of which date back to the 1800s. The indoor facility documents the history of Mennonites from their origins in the Netherlands and Switzerland and focuses on the Plautdietsch-speaking Russian Mennonites who came to Western Canada. Temporary exhibits, also open year-round, are held in the Gerhard Enns Gallery.

The museum is famous for its Dutch windmill, a replica of the original windmill built in Steinbach in the 1880s. The first replica was burned down by arsonists in 2000, but was later rebuilt. The outdoor village also displays a section of the Berlin Wall, the original sawmill used by Mennonite Conscientious Objectors during their Alternative Service in World War II, and two important monuments originally erected in Russia to commemorate the centennial of Chortitza and honour the two Mennonite leaders, Jacob Hoeppner and Johann Bartsch, who chose the site and accompanied the first colonists. The museum holds numerous special events and festivals, including the Pioneer Days Parade and festival each August. The museum also has a restaurant that serves Russian Mennonite food (open seasonally) and a bookstore (open year-round). In 2018, a statue of Anabaptist martyr Dirk Willems by sculptor Peter Sawatzky was unveiled on the grounds of the museum.


lac clear water
lac clear water


Ontario, 4th-20th June 2010

Summary: We spent 15 Days in Ontario Province, Canada from 4th to the 20th of June 2010


We took 372 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Ontario the following were some of the highlights, nipigon, wawa, elliot lake, new liskeard, musselmans lake, Toronto which we are glad we visited although in reality were not that impressed by (along with Montreal in Quebec province, maybe as travellers we prefer being away from the big cities I suspect that is the answer, anyhow we did see the CN tower and surrounds and walked along the river’s edge to see all the restaurants, note the G20 conference was due to be on in Toronto whilst we were in Canada that year, getting up early to watch England get knocked out of the world cup football and flying our flag on the motorhome, tee-hee, Niagara falls which was just magical, we did do the maid of the mist boat trip and put on those flimsy pak-a-maks which in reality afforded little or no protection against the force of that water, we got close and also marvelled at some of the history of the fool hardy who went over the edge into it in a barrel, I ask you would you, we also read and saw how the devil’s hole whirlpool in the accompanying Niagara river was so forceful, we loved the Niagara area, 1000 islands boat trip from Gananoque which was just fantastic and covered that really weird Boldt Castle on route and an amazing number of very small but mostly exclusive islands with yachts etc and either Canadian or American flags proudly displayed and sometimes both, when we returned from the boat trip armed with the recipe Keef made 1000 island sauce to go with our salad, see the recipe below, percy lake, ignace, sault ste marie, wabigoon lakes, agimak lake & beach, rossport, terrace bay, pays plat, thunder bay, the great lakes-superior, huron, ontario & dipping my toe in them – I made a point no matter how cold the water was of taking one sock off and dipping my toe in them so I could say I had “swam” in all of the great lakes which along with the Prairie Provinces I remember studying at school with our Geography teacher the somewhat outlandish Rev Rooney who had spent much time in Africa being a missionary and photographing tribes and showing us schoolkids on the big screen – maybe I learnt my interest in travel from him, maybe it’s just in my DNA, the reality is I did do the toe dipping in all of them bar Lake Michegan, we didn’t go over the US border into that State, maybe another time, you never know, Niagara on the lake, the snow goose, Sinclair cove, mounties, ottawa, aguasarbon falls, entering central standard time, lake superior national park, latchford, spanish, temigami, temiskaming shores, bobbie rosenfeld olympian & park, Wilson island, passport, squirrels Canadian style, white river views, cousins in parry sound, a big welcome to Ontario but sadly not being able to meet up with annies cuz Jamie, bottles in the sewage systems at campsites to prevent odours when using the provided triple services, ha-ha, the lovely Ontario capital Ottawa, stouffville, niagara botanical gardens, floral clock, devils hole whirlpool, st Lawrence river, Gananoque town and harbour, rideau falls, river and canal, byward market, haileybury the home of Annie's rellies and all those kid ex school pupils of Uncle Ralph’s who were now either teachers at his old school or worked in the local museum who helped us locate places of interest and aided our family research. Genealogy is fun, fact!


Here are a few words and facts in summary about Niagara Falls.

Niagara Falls, city in the Regional Municipality of Niagara, south-eastern Ontario, Canada, a port on the Niagara River opposite Niagara Falls, New York. The city overlooks the Horseshoe, or Canadian, falls cataract of Niagara Falls; the crescent-shaped cataract is 54 M (177 ft) high and carries nine times more water than its United States counterpart. Niagara Falls is an enormously popular tourist destination, and it also serves as a major source of electricity for Ontario.

The city is connected to the U.S. side of the falls by several bridges, including the Rainbow, Whirlpool, and Queenston-Lewiston bridges. Principal manufactures include processed food, abrasives, chemicals, automotive parts, metal and paper goods, and wines and alcoholic beverages. Logistics, i.e., storage and warehousing and information technology/call centres are also important to the city's economy.

Points of interest include Queen Victoria Park, adjacent to the Canadian Falls and principal site of the annual Winter Festival of Lights; the historical museum at Lundy's Lane, site of a brutal battle between American and British forces in 1814; The Maid of the Mist, Marineland, with Friendship Cove which provides interaction with Killer and Beluga whales, an aquatic theatre and a game farm; Skylon Tower and Pavilion, containing a revolving restaurant and an observation deck overlooking the falls; the Butterfly Conservatory at the Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens; Canada One Factory Outlets which features brand name shopping


And the accompanying Maid of the Mist, America’s most iconic boat ride since 1846, which was its maiden voyage.

See the raging currents. Hear the deafening thunder. And feel the refreshing mist of 600,000 gallons of water falling before your eyes every second. Experience it all aboard the iconic Maid of the Mist.

It’s the one and only tour boat fleet whose captains have safely navigated the mighty waters of the Niagara Gorge for over 100 years, taking tens of millions of visitors directly into the centre of the swirling mist. Dress code: blue rain poncho optional. But we highly suggest you wear it, or else… 😉

Before this date, rowboats ferried passengers across the Niagara River below the Falls. By 1846, however, entrepreneurs decided a bigger craft could profit by transporting people, luggage, mail and cargo. So, the first Maid of the Mist steamboat, large enough to carry a stagecoach and horses, was christened. In 1848, construction of a suspension bridge curtailed business and the Maid of the Mist was re-branded as a sightseeing adventure that still operates to this day.


Recipe for Thousand Islands dressing, if you’ve been there you have to sue it and we did in the van so here goes, Ingredients List

1/2 clove garlic, minced

1/4 tsp salt plus more to taste

190ml prepared or homemade mayonnaise

60ml bottled chilli sauce

2 tbsp tomato ketchup

1 1/2 tbsp minced onion

2 tsp sweet pickle relish

1/2 hard-cooked large egg, pushed through a sieve or finely chopped

Freshly ground black pepper

How to make

Make a paste with the garlic and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt by crushing them with the side of a chef's knife. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the garlic, mayonnaise, chilli sauce, ketchup, onion, relish, and egg until combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Use now or store covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.


niagara botanic gardens
niagara botanic gardens

Quebec, 3 parts, 10-12 June, 18-24 June, 13 July 2010

Summary: We spent 11 Days in Quebec Province, Canada in 3 parts, 10-12 June, 18-24 June and finally 13 July 2010


We took 178 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Quebec the following were some of the highlights, montreal and its surrounding areas, we had quite a walk through the central areas, I remember the world cup was blearing out on city centre TV’s and I think this was the year France won it if memory serves me right, I’m wrong it was held in Africa for the 1st time, south Africa and Spain beat Holland 1-0, we watched it in th campsite bar on 11th July, we were in nova scotia on the way to newfoundland when we watched it probably at Antigonish I certainly remember having a meal with wine at the outside bar/ restaurant whilst it was on, quebec city, fort quebec, queens governor’s residence and sitting on the wall with fab views out over Quebec city, The Fairmont Chateau Frontenac and its pure French chateau presence in the landscape and walking the boardwalk in front of it, this is the Fairmont one rather than that in Paris , saguenay fjord, tadoussac, trois pistoles and the lovely sunset as the ferry crossed the st Lawrence, just magical, gaspe and its peninsular a spectacular coastline with views to die for, bike race through Quebec city and all the spectators out to see it on a very warm day in the old capital, the citadel, st lawrence river, lac timiscaming, les escoumins, bardville, ferry, grande grave, campsite juneau, cap de rosier, forillon national park, camping baie de gaspe, riviere au renard, basilica notre dame du quebec, rocking chairs, kayaks, l’heritage 1, light houses, boardwalks, musicians, rooftops, skyscrapers, robbie burns in montreal, maison maillou, point a la recommee, dolphins, possibly whales, sunsets, provisional and national parcs, more of the trans-canada highway or as we say in quebquoise "Route Transcanadienne" & all ports in between. All very French "trois service sil vous plais" We have been from one side of Canada to the other, oh you know that by now... think I've mentioned it ha-ha.


All very French it was so weird as we crossed the bridge near Ottawa into Quebec province, all of a sudden it was totally French, other things we remember well were wild roses, buffalo bill’s travelling show memorabilia, the old Victoria esplanade in front of the chateau hotel Frontenac, museums, history, wolfe and his battles (probably better not to mention in Quebec) ha-ha, number plates displaying “Je Me Souviens” or I remember Quebec, maillou house history, hotel Jardin ste anne, surrealist art work in Quebec city, St Roch, Benjo buses, sunsets on the St Lawrence and just enjoying the slightly different cultural feel of being in Quebec province, we will both miss and remember.

New Brunswick, in 2 parts 24 Jun-8 July and then the 21st July 2010

Summary: We spent 14 Days in New Brunswick Maritime Province, Canada in 2 parts, the first being 24 June to the 8th July, and finally just 21st July 2010


We took 78 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For New Brunswick the following were some of the highlights, alma, campbellton, lighthouses, miscou island and our lovely walk along the peat bog boardwalk here across the bridge to the island, lots of waterlilies and wild flowers, lamere island, kouchibouguac national park, bay of fundy national park, the world beating tidal height changes in the Bay of Fundy, we watched it, it’s just amazing how far it drops down to the mud beds deep below the coastal edge, all New Brunswick’s provincial parcs as well as National ones, butland's lobster, beaver tails resaurants and Tim Horton coffee, art and art galleries, music, arcadians, Micmac’s a native Indian tribe whom the band we saw in France in 2014 took their name from, indeed we liked the band so much we bought their CD, McAdam station and tourist information and museum, cape jourmain, confederation bridge, sea dogs ice hockey, covered cedar bridge tunnels, hopewell rocks, grand anse, baseball, bog walks, board walks, plant life, harbors and now in English harbours ha-ha, sun and rain in equal measures, magnetic hill and taking the van to it and getting a feeling you were going backwards, magic village, Bathurst with its fabulous coastline and viewing platforms and lighthouses plus its fab village hill, val-comeau and its board walk, cap egmont, Moncton – which in fairness we were not that impressed with, sadly another big town / city that just didn’t do it for us, Saint john (as opposed to st johns in newfoundland) looking for Annie’s rellies as well as moving back from the edge of the precipice in its campsite to a somewhat safer pitch although in Keef’s humble opinion the view in the 1st pitch was fab,also we visited the home of the St John Sea Dogs ice hockey team, ice hockey is huge in Canada, witness mr Horton, we back in Nottingham have an English team called the Nottingham Panthers who aren’t bad either, petitcodiac river, possum in the road kill cafe, whose rather worrying catch phrase is “you kill ‘em, we grill ‘em”, keef bought one of their T-Shirts.


Fredericton for Canada Day 1 July , it was Canada’s 143 birthday, and was just so nice , it was lucky we were able to get a slot at the campsite for Canada Day as it was incredibly busy and the main celebrations were on in town which was lovely, dogs dressed as Mounties and Anne of Green Gables, live music, food, drink, people with flags and all forms of Canada memorabilia from chairs to jackets and t-shirts, we joined in by waving, furiously, the provided mini Canada maple leaf flags, true patriots that we are. Also, very friendly people at the shindig. We spent a couple of days in Fredericton exploring the town and museums as well as celebrating Canada day. The old Town hall was very interesting. The other thing we remember is a crowd of Japanese tourists at the campsite asking if they could come and have a look inside our motorhome as it is not anything they had ever seen before, hilarious, reminds me of when Phoenix’s parents came to stay with us from China in the UK and asked a lot of questions about our Wendy House motorhome. We returned the second time to pass thru to Prince Edward Island as David & Cathy were on holiday there.


Here are some words about the Confederation Bridge, an amazing feat of engineering, that we had the pleasure of traversing 4 times on our Canada holiday in 2010.

The Confederation Bridge joins the eastern Canadian provinces of Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, making travel throughout the Maritimes easy and convenient. The curved, 12.9 kilometre (8 mile) long bridge is the longest in the world crossing ice-covered water and continues to endure as one of Canada’s top engineering achievements of the 20th century.

The decision to replace the existing ferry service with a fixed link followed a heated debate throughout the 1980’s. Farmers, fishermen, tourism operators, and residents of Prince Edward Island had sharply contrasting opinions about how year-round access to the mainland would affect their way of life and livelihood. Eventually, it was decided that the debate would be settled at the polls. The federal department of Public Works and Government Services selected its favourite bridge design out of several proposals from the private sector, and on January 18, 1988, Premier Joseph Ghiz asked Prince Edward Islanders to make the final decision in a plebiscite. At the polls, 59.4% of Islanders voted “Yes” to a fixed link. After four years of construction using crews of more than five thousand local workers, the Confederation Bridge opened to traffic on May 31, 1997.

Today, the Confederation Bridge is operated by Strait Crossing Bridge Limited, headquartered in the shadow of the bridge in Borden-Carleton, Prince Edward Island.


Prince Edward Island (PEI) 7 days in 2 parts, 27-30 June and again 21-23 July 2013

Summary: We spent 7 Days on Prince Edward Island in in 2 parts, 27-30 June and again 21-23 July 2013


We took 90 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Prince Edward Island a true Canadian holiday resort or as some would rather unkindly call it “spud island” the following were some of the highlights, Crossing over the magnificent Confederation bridge we went to Summerside holiday village, it has a little lake , the statutory statue, if you will forgive the repetition, of island heroine, Anne, i.e. Anne of green gables house at cavendish in the wonderful PEI national park, we spent a good part of the day here and were fascinated to see how popular this book is with Japanese students, maybe it is a course text book, who knows, loved the capital Charlottetown, many heritage buildings, crossing the 8 miles of the fab confederation bridge arriving at Borden Carleton, meeting up with friends - the lovely Harvey’s, we made 2 visits here , so basically did 32 miles along the bridge and never luckily encountered any high winds, saw live music at the bridge folk club in the evening, fab fiddle and guitar stuff, visited the bottle house , Tignish at the top end, cape Egmont and its lighthouse keeping watch over the gulf of st Lawrence , north cape and park quite remote, Rollo bay, Souris where the cap aux meules island ferry in the gulf of st Lawrence leaves from, north point lighthouse, north Rustico, PEI's Malpeque bay which is almost an inland bay , Lennox island although we drove over to this so hardly an island nowadays as t has its own bridge, bridge construction in this area is a true marvel especially the length of the confederation bridge and its support against snow, ice and incredible winds, west point, jacque cartier provincial park, government house, shopping with pals in victoria, Georgetown, spud radio, lobsters, energy institute, queens wharf, Lucy Maud Montgomery authoress, prince Edward island national park, Charlottetown sand sculptures including a fab one of the bridge which you can see on our Maritime Provinces Talkies videos and cedar cladding on housing.


We liked PEI its history and its relaxed atmosphere and our weather whilst here was quite good.

Nova Scotia (NS) 11 Days in 3 parts, 7-9, 16-21,23-24 July 2013


Summary: We spent 11 Days in Nova Scotia in 3 parts, 7-9, 16-21,23-24 July 2013 and a extra half day on the 1st and 2nd occasion

We took 294 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.

We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Nova Scotia the following were some of the highlights, the wonderful bay of fundy, or Baie de Fundy, look at that I am observing the Canadian desire to be multi lingual although in all honesty we were surprised that despite Québec's desire for this to happen and maybe some elements in New Brunswick the road signs were bi-lingual in all Provinces bar Quebec, no logically how does that conform, yours puzzled bt it does seem to be a bit of a cultural battle that we noticed across Canada….


To summarise the thing about the Bay of Fundy is it is a bay between the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia with a small portion touching the US State of Maine. It has an extremely high tidal range which is the highest in the world. The name is likely a corruption of the French word fendu, meaning 'split'. See our images for more detail of this fabulous Bay.


We went back via Nova Scotia to Prince Edward Island to see our dear pals David and Cathy again for a few days, there are many heritage buildings in Nova Scotia especially at Annapolis Royal which was just lovely with its old weather-boarded classy Hotels & Lunenburg which is UNESCO world heritage and we can easily see why, we attended around the time of the highland games at Antigonish preserving their distinctly Scottish roots, watching both Highland dancing and lots of Bag Pipe music, sadly watching someone's caravan awning bend in high winds at the Antigonish campsite, we also visited wolfville, crossing the fab confederation bridge near mayfield (NB) , Cape Breton National Park , the world famous Peggy’s cove @ st margarets bay, Halifax Nova Scotia’s capital and KEITHs beer of course I got the t-shirt, why wouldn’t I ? caught the ferry from sydney to newfoundland, after having fast food at KFC and foolishly drinking far too much fizzy pop in fast food joint (free refill - never again!) had awful gut ache all the way across on the ferry, myt fault and self-induced, still you learn by your mistakes and that was a big one, tee hee there really is no such thing as a free lunch, cap le Moine, cheticamp, Cape Breton island, the truly magnificent views of the cabot trail, do take a look at some of our many pictures, camping at Pugwash, digby, bridgewater, peat bog walks, north river, lakie's head, Pictou, Glenora distillery the only single malt in Canada which I did buy a bottle of and very nice it was too, clearly had to have a taster first but only a very small one as was driving, basically it touched my lips and I got that distinctive peaty taste. Nice.


Remember well Ingonish beach and freshwater lake in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park, maybe Jump from ocean saltwater at Ingonish Beach to Freshwater Lake with just a few steps! This welcoming day use area is packed with family-friendly activities. After a refreshing swim, enjoy the playground, tennis courts, soccer field and picnic area. Connect with nature on Freshwater Lake trail, popular with cyclists in the summer and perfect for snowshoeing in the winter. Also loved broad cove campground, joe’s scarecrow visited by billy connolly and us (sadly close 2011), oxford, Amherst, truro, highland national park, Louisbourg and the fortress, wolfe and the french, halifax’s murray-mackay bridge, pier 21, prospect, Shelburne, port maitland beach, crescent beach, lobster stalls at Yarmouth which were either old tram or railway carriages, Yarmouth is famous for both fishing and tourism plus we noted you can catch a ferry here to Portland, Maine no not the one in Oregon, plus lockeport and many more truly fabulous places, we really HEART Nova Scotia and its distinctively Scottish feel and scenery. Here is a little bit about the heritage and history of Louisbourg we visited, the French military founded the fortress of Louisbourg in 1713 and its fortified seaport on the southwest part of the harbour, naming it in honour of Louis XIV , the Sun King, a legend in his own lunchbox, ha-ha. The harbour had been used by European mariners since at least the 1590s, when it was known as English Port and Havre à l'Anglois. The French settlement that dated from 1713. The settlement was burned the first day the British landed during the siege of Louisbourg in 1745. The French were terrorized and abandoned the Grand Battery, which the British occupied the following day. It was returned to France in 1748 but recaptured by the British in 1758.

After the capture in 1758, its fortifications were demolished in 1760 and the town-site abandoned by British forces in 1768. A small civilian population continued to live there after the military left.

English settlers subsequently built a small fishing village across the harbour from the abandoned site of the fortress. The village grew slowly with additional loyalist settlers in the 1780s. The harbour grew more accessible with the construction of the second lighthouse in 1842 on the site of the original French lighthouse which was destroyed in 1758. A railway first reached Louisbourg in 1877, but it was poorly built and abandoned after a forest fire. However, the arrival of Sydney & Louisbourg railway in 1894 brought heavy volumes of winter coal exports to Louisbourg Harbour's ice-free waters as a winter coal port. The harbour was used by the Canadian government ship Montmagny in 1912 to land bodies from the sinking of the Titanic. In 1913 Marconi established a transatlantic radio transmitting station here. History wise that’s all folks, hope it was of use.

Newfoundland, 11-16 July 2010

Summary: We spent 6 Days in Newfoundland which was continuous apart from an overnight stay in Labrador


We took 158 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


For Newfoundland the following were some of the highlights of Newfoundland (home of the Newfies) along, however as an overview The Strait of Belle Isle separates the combined province into two geographical parts: Labrador, which is a large area of mainland Canada but in fairness so much more remote, and Newfoundland, an island in the Atlantic Ocean. Those highlights are St Johns (as opposed to st john in NB) fab harbour views here, it is also the capital of the bigger Province and the Province’s largest City and is also the Eastern most City in North America if you exclude Greenland which isn’t really either a city or in North America although technically as on the North American tectonic plate it counts. St John’s was first inhabited by seasonal fishermen in the early 1500’s but was named fully by Sebastian Cabot.


We remember moose by the roadside, the wonderful gros morne national park which is a UNESCO world heritage site and the 2nd largest National Park in Canada, Gros Morne is one of the most uniquely beautiful places in Canada. Nestled on the edge of western Newfoundland, Gros Morne National Park exhibits amazing experiences all year round, one of the most unique times of year to visit is the fall. We didn’t, it was July but still super nice, in fall the blazing red, yellow and orange hues that are painted throughout the park illuminate the already majestic landscape. Exploring this landscape on the trails, paths, and tours becomes even more magical when you feel like you are the only one here. September and October are much quieter than summer; this grants you the space to enjoy the park peacefully and at your own pace. Visiting Gros Morne during this time is an enchanting experience and every hike and trail is vibrant, beautiful, and serene.


Other visited places were gander, bonavista, conception bay, st marys, icebergs floating past, st anthony museum and the size of a polar bear, ferry at st barbe to labrador via a very small corner of Quebec province as the ferry goes to Sablon-Blanc which is 2 kilometers from the border, very early morning sailing in rain and mist, indeed we experience quite a lot of rain (sometimes torrential) which lead to some lovely waterfalls, we parked in the ferry car park overnight so as not to miss it, port aux basque, deer lake, pasadena, massey drive, badger township (what a great name), grand falls windsor, sights of grand lake, corner brook, crows hill lookout which we went up and got some fab views and learnt more about our world discovered hero from Middleborough Captain James Cook, my pal Kevin Jackson was writing a short story about our hero when he sadly passed far too young, you can get Kevon’s short story series on Amazon, they are often in the Top 10 short stories, seeing again the trans-Canada highway old car rally near corner brook, fab whale museum and houses at scilly cove (now winterton) off Highway 74, home of Annie's rellie john masters, indian harbour and indian bay, deadman's bay, dover, steady brook, 3 mile rock, terra nova national park, l’anse au meadows, old perlican, blong beach, pynns brook, the arches pronincial park, springdale, south brook, grate cove, gambo, the perlican, nymph island, portland creek, little hearts ease (such a lovely name) and the equally wonderfully named come by chance , red rocks, noddy bay, hawkes bay, daniel's harbor, st lunaire-griquet, the arches NP, ss ethie in Gros Morne NP, southport trinity bay, bonne & shallow bays, gunners cove, cape ray, pidgeon cove, fishing point park and wreck house brook plus its fab old railway sign.


We lived Newfoundland a lot, an Atlantic Island that had a lot going for it, but one word of warning do not travel at night with all those Moose around, it could be fatal, lots have bounced across peoples bonnets and crashed through their windscreens, I’m just saying, sorry.


imgae of blanc-sablon quebec province near labrador

Labrador, 12th & 13th July 2010

Summary: We spent 2 Days and one night in Newfoundland


We took 51 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever.


As an overview The Strait of Belle Isle separates the combined province of Newfoundland and Labrador into two geographical parts: Labrador, which is a large area of mainland Canada but in fairness so much more remote, and Newfoundland, an island in the Atlantic Ocean. The vast expanse of Labrador is mainly served by the perma frost road the Trans Labrador Highway, which we visited the start of, would love to travel it in winter, what an experience that must be and scary I bet.


For Labrador the following were some of the highlights the Apollo ferry departing st barbe newfoundland at an ungodly hour and arriving at blanc sablon which is 2 kilometres from Labrador's border , cold, wet, foggy, misty and early ha-ha, intra-provincial ferry service, welcome to the big land, L’Anse au Clair (where we camped overnight), Loving the UNESCO world heritage township at Red Bay, it is a natural harbour residing in the bay that gives it its name, both names in reference to the red granite cliffs of the region. Because of the sheltered harbour it was used during World War II as a mooring site for naval vessels. In the bay are Penney Island and Saddle Island, which were used by the Basque fishermen for their whaling operations. The location of the sunken vessel San Juan is near Saddle Island.


We also remember travelling a small bit of the jersey trail at L’anse au Clair, here are some words about it, the trail follows the shoreline of the small town of L'Anse Au Clair which is nestled against rugged clifftops and benchland sloping down to a beautiful red sandy beach. You can walk between 3 and 6 km along this easy trail of crushed stone as it weaves along boulder fields, tuck more and beach. Interpretation tells the story of 19th century fishermen from Jersey, an island in the English Channel between England and France. Look for the infamous " Bubbling Sands" feature of this trail.


We also remember visiting L’Anse au cotard and its church, the jersey rooms, abandoned tankers rusting, Basque fisherman, Forteau, L’Anse au covert, L’Anse amour, red bay united reform church, dinosaur feet, tapestry, fishing jetties, whaling museum history, sadly little work now on Labrador’s coast so many join the army, fishing is not the industry it once was, Tracey wicking battery and the Tracey Hill Walking trail board walk in Red Bay, some history and advice is, at the start of the Tracey Hill Walking Trail in the town of Red Bay, Southern Labrador, a boardwalk and the first of 689 steps lead the way. The climb up the stairs will reach the destination point at the top of Tracey Hill where the scenery is breath-taking.

The trail is moderate on a degree of difficulty and runs for 1.5 kilometres, a return trip of 3. The average time along the boardwalk and stairs of the Tracey Hill Walking Trail is about 30 minutes, but many stop for breaks. Picnic tables, telescopes and a resting area makes the journey longer, but this is a day well spent while visiting Red Bay in Southern Labrador. The Boardwalk and stairs at the start of the Tracey Hill Walking Trail in the town of Red Bay, Highway 510, Labrador Coastal Drive also counts as one of the Viking Trail, in the Straits of Belle Isle, Southern Labrador, Labrador, Canada. Maybe give it a go when you ever visit, we just did the start bit and had a mooch around, sadly not the whole thing, not enough time in Labrador.



Plus, the earliest burial mound and monument in the world at L’Anse amour, traditional stone men along the roadside, red bay including the museum and look out at old whaling station, saddle, Penney & capstan islands, Fogo island punt race, trapper and whalemen memorabilia, start of the Trans Labrador highway (gravel and permafrost) oh and black fly galore on the Pinware river bridge.


Although our time on Labrador’s southern coast was short our memories will be long, it was a fascinating place to visit.


Upstate New York, America 14-15 June 2010

Summary: We spent 2 Days and one night in Upstate New York


We took 28 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever. We dropped over the border twice once into upstate New York around Niagara Falls on Lake Ontario and once into Maine around McAdam.


For Upstate New York the following were some of the highlights, a fraught crossing at Lewiston into the states because of the hired motorhome, they impounded it for a while, presumably thinking we had stolen it, amazingly officious handed us a form to complete which we did but when I tried handing it back to them they purposefully ignored me, not nice, we were there for hours. On return to Canada it was via wellesley island Annie was greeted with "mam I've told you to remove those sun glasses, I want to see the whites of your eyes" (smile), kind and welcoming eh? not! I can only conclude as old hippies we look dodgy ha-ha. Anyhow we also visited Niagara falls (both canadian and us sides), stella Niagara, US highway 18 better known as the lake ontario state parkway, towers corners, roosevelt beach, wilson, olcott, somerset, 4th july flags everywhere, Braddock bay wildlife area, syracuse, rochester with its zoo and museum of play, banal local tv about geese "sh***ting on boardwalk", we took interstate highway 490 onto the 90 out of Rochester along to syracuse, via Farmington, clifton springs, Montezuma (fab name) , Weedsport and Jordan , oh and the trash can episode at the very nice campsite on the lake edge near Syracuse, we were camping by Oneida lake shores, this lake is named after the Iroquois tribe, its 21 miles long by 5 miles wide and is the largest lake in NY state, it feeds into lake Ontario via the river Oneida I believe but could be wrong, we had some nice paddles and walks along the lake shore whilst camping there, then it was onto watertown, back to canada via cicero & pulaski on state highway 81 (sometimes referred to as the great indian warpath) , apples & cherries, country stores, hummers plus crossing back to Canada near Wellesley island, Youngstown & the boss was special one of my fave tracks. It also famous for & 3 times Superbowl winner Dallas Cowboy Daryl "The Moose" Johnson who was born here.


So glad we popped over the border despite the hassle of getting there and back, travelling along Lake Ontario’s shore on the Stateside was special. Nice Memories.

Maine, America, 3-5 July 2010

Summary: We spent 3 Days and 3 nights in Maine


We took 69 Photos, many of which are included in the summary slideshows.


We have now been from one side of Canada to the other in a motorhome, British Columbia to Labrador, we loved it, it is a fabulous country and quite an achievement with memories we shall treasure forever. We dropped over the border twice once into upstate New York around Niagara Falls on Lake Ontario and once into Maine via the Vanceboro- St Croix border crossing over the St Croix River which separates Canada and America.

The crossing is sometimes named McAdam. In the early 1900s, this crossing was located at the adjacent lock structure a short distance to the north. At some point in the distant past (at least prior to 1930), a bridge existed to the south of the railroad bridge, extending from Public Crossing Road on the Canadian side. Concrete footings for this bridge remain on the US side at this site.


Some of the Maine visit highlights were Independence Day (4th) , bar harbor, Lincoln, st croix vanceboro bridge and border crossing if the truth be known we thought we had found a crossing that would be somewhat less officious after our experience coming into Upstate New York, it wasn’t quite so bad but still a huge number of checks and they came on the van to check we weren’t smuggling anyone across, still they were only doing their job and extremely good at doing it they were, we’d come over on highway 4 in NB then highway 6 in Maine from Lambert Lake thru Lee to Lincoln, then travelling the Interstate Highway 95 through to Bangor, then Edinburg & Argyle (notice anything Scottish here ha-ha) down to Bar Harbor, fish warehouses, 6 sailed yacht as sunset, the red sails blending in which we watched as the sun started to set just fabulous really, cedar clad buildings everywhere, lobster claus xmas humour, state flag, number plates, geddys down under aussie bar, lobster pots and floats, camping at both bar harbor and lubec, Quoddy Head State Park, heritage shops and historic buildings, yummy ice-cream, envy for airstream motorhomes and harley davidson motorbikes, , welcome to maine, the way life should be and who are we to disagree, memorial gardens, Sunkhaze Meadows, Holden, Elseworth, Trenton, also spednik lake, lubec town and its harbour and coastline, washington county, endless fish options, clam chowder, eden market, the cat bay ferry from yarmouth nova scotia which we also saw up in Yarmouth when visiting, west quoddy lighthouse which is the eastern most point in the whole of the United States, shopping for milk in Lincoln "near the guns, rifles and bullets, sir!", 4th july at campsite near bar harbor, flags, burgers and beers, plus crossing back to canada , Jonesboro, st croix river, blueberries growing wild, lobster rolls (yummy) from gas stations and even Maccy D's , probably the last time we went in one, tee-hee but the lobster rolls in Maine were just so tasty and fresh, mentally swapping back to miles not kilometres and cheap gas. We have now been from one side of Canada to the other and visited quite a few states in America. #tick


Here is a bit of a write up on the whole area we visited in Maine, namely Washington County Washington County is sometimes referred to as the "Sunrise County" because it includes the eastern most point in the United States, and where many believe the sun first rises on the forty-eight contiguous states.

Natural resources comprise a large portion of economic activity in the county. Blueberries play a major role; nearly 85% of the world's supply of wild blueberries comes from Washington County. Lobsters accounted for over $45 million dollars of economic activity in 2014.

Washington County was established June 25, 1789, in conjunction with Hancock County. Originally Washington County stretched along the eastern border of New Brunswick all the way to the disputed northern boundary with Canada. Machias was established as the shire town.

Named for George Washington, the county encompasses two cities, forty towns, three plantations and two Native American areas. It covers 3,258 square miles (2,563 square miles of land and 695 square miles of water, or 21%). The population is 32, 856 (2010) which works out to about 13 people per square mile.

The population is located, for the most part, along the coast. This makes sense historically because water travel brought settlers to the area in the first place. Vast natural resources were the attraction and served to support the establishment of many communities. The more interior half of the county is considered Unorganized Territories and holds about 1200 people.

What makes Washington County so special is a question of an entirely different sort and demands a different response. It takes four hours to drive from one end of the county to the other. During that drive the topography changes, reflecting the glacial scouring of 10,000 years ago. Left behind were rock formations, lakes and streams, and wide-open expanses to rival the plains. And in that landscape an independent sort live, work and raise their families.

Washington County is a lot of things. It is the most gorgeous, has the deepest cargo port, the longest coastline including the Bold Coast, the highest tides, and produces the most lobster and clam landings. What Washington County does not have is lots of traffic lights (only three in the whole county), an interstate, a Red Lobster Restaurant, or poisonous snakes.

Welcome to Washington County.


We Liked Maine a lot, relaxed feel , fab sights and lobster so fresh it could almost walk up to your plate.


dream harley at bar harbor
dream harley at bar harbor

AUDIOBOOK



24 views2 comments